Errors are feared in carbon dating

Seagrass plants have an excellent capacity for taking up and storing carbon in the oxygen-depleted seabed, where it decomposes much slower than on land.

This oxygen-free sediment traps the carbon in the dead plant material which may then remain buried for hundreds of years.

The discovery has some fairly frightening implications because it’s crucial to archaeology to have steady fixation points in the dating work.

There’s probably no need to rewrite the history books, but it’s likely that they contain some incorrectly dated excavation sites, Associate Professor Felix Riede told Aarhus University’s newsletter “This is food for thought, especially in an old fishing nation like Denmark.

Before they started on the research project, the archaeologists were fully aware that dating of fish is subject to a large margin of error.

They just didn’t know how big it was, nor how fish affect the Carbon-14 contents in the clay vessels that they were prepared in.

Protons and neutrons make up the center (nucleus) of the atom, and electrons form shells around the nucleus.

When these organisms die and fossilise, they appear to be much older than they actually are.

And, strange as it may sound, this has an effect on the Carbon-14 content in the clay pots that were used for cooking fish.

With our focus on one particular form of radiometric dating—carbon dating—we will see that carbon dating strongly supports a young earth.

Note that, contrary to a popular misconception, carbon dating is not used to date rocks at millions of years old.

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