Dating postcards stamps updating entire tables using update query

1917, 1 January: 15 centimes Post card with less than 5 words: 10 c 1920, 1 April: 20 c 1926, 1 May: 30 c 1926, 9 August: 40 c 1937, 12 July: 55 c 1938, 17 November: 70 c 1939, 1 December: 80 c 1942, 5 January: 1 franc 20 centimes / 1.20 F 1945, 1 March: 1.50 F 1946, 1 January: 2.50 F , 3 January: 3.80 F 1947, 1 March: 3.50 F 1947, 8 July: 5 F 1948, 21 September: 8 F 1951, 8 December: 12 F 1957, 1 July: 15 F 1959, 6 January: 20 F • The franc was devalued 100-fold so 1 new franc = 100 old francs.1960, 1 January: 20 centimes (the 1 January 1959 tariff expressed in new francs) 1965, 18 January: 25 c 1969, 13 January: 30 c • From 1971, 4 January: there are two tariffs - urgent and non-urgent.Thanks also to Chuck Harbert; and to Nina Webber, whose donated postcards are used for the examples on this page.Compiled by Todd Ellison, Certified Archivist (last revised 8/7/2006)Although the world's first picture postcards date from the 1860s to the mid-1870s, most of the earliest American picture postcards extant today are those that were sold at the World Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois, starting on May 1, 1893. At this time, a dozen or more American printers began to take postcards seriously.

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Another possibility for finding an old postcard with a relatively modern postmark date is someone had taken the whim to stamp and post a vintage postcard.The urgent postcard postage tariff followed the letter tariff.The non-urgent postcards follow the rate for non-urgent letters [] 1971, 4 January: 50 c (urgent), 30 c (non-urgent) 1974, 16 September: 80 c (urgent), 60 c (non-urgent) 1976, 2 August: 1F (urgent), 80 c (non-urgent) 1978, 15 May: 1.20 F (urgent), 1 F (non-urgent) 1979, 15 October: 1.30 F (urgent), 1.10 F (non-urgent) 1980, 1 August: 1.40 F (urgent), 1.20 F (non-urgent) 1981, 1 September: 1.60 F (urgent), 1.40 F (non-urgent) 1982, 1 June: 1.80 F (urgent), 1.60 F (non-urgent) 1983, 1 June: 2 F (urgent), 1.60 F (non-urgent) 1984, 1 July: 2.10 F (urgent), 1.70 F (non-urgent) 1985, 1 August: 2.20 F (urgent), 1.80 F (non-urgent) 1986, 1 August: 2.20 F (urgent), 1.90 F (non-urgent) 1987, 1 August: 2.20 F (urgent), 2 F (non-urgent) 1993, 5 July: 2.80 F (urgent), 2.40 F (simple) 1996, 18 March: 3 F (urgent), 2.70 F (economic) • On 1 January : France’s currency changed to euro (symbol: €). 2003, 1 June: 0.50 € (urgent),0.45 € (economic) 2005, 1 March: 0.48 € (economic, the same tariff as second-class letters - , and were usually printed advertising cards. During the first half of the twentieth century, packs of six, ten, twelve or even twenty and more cards were issued in two different formats.The “paid-for by sender” postal system was developed by Rowland Hill.A standardised postage was paid for by the sender, who purchased a stamp to attach to the letter, rather than the receiver. The stamp showed a side portrait of Queen Victoria at age 15.

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