Dating old ball jars

Other popular jars made by Ball include the Some Ball Perfect Mason jars are found with the number “13” on the bottom.As mentioned earlier in this article, most Ball-produced jars are typically found with a mold number ranged between 0 and 15, so naturally some percentage of them will carry the number “13”.Some of these colors might be known under other/different names depending on who is describing them!There are various shades and tints of these colors out there.The underline may be very long, or heavily “looped”.Most of the typical Ball Perfect Mason’s are marked with a mold number between 0 and 15 on the bottom.Hundreds of millions (probably upwards of a billion or more!) were made, and these jars have been used by home canners throughout much of the 20th century.

Some jars have embossing that is unusually faint ( for instance, just one or two letters within a word) and this can sometimes be due to accumulated debris partially filling the engraving of the lettering on the mold itself at the time of making, or perhaps some other reason.Rumors have circulated for years (and have especially been promoted on auction sites and by flea market and antique mall dealers) that superstitious distillers of illegal whiskey (“moonshiners”) who often use fruit jars to contain their product, were hesitant to use jars marked with a 13 on the bottom.According to the stories, they threw them away, or intentionally broke them, fearing their enterprise could otherwise be met with bad luck.On some jar variants, (such as the first BALL embossing variant on these jars, “Logo 5” in chart shown below, used circa 1913-1923 on BPM jars), the number be accompanied by a letter to the right, such as A or C.As can be readily discovered, there were many different “sets” of molds used over a period of many years, with this same series of (up to) 16 numbers used over and over again to identify the molds being used on a particular machine.

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