Dating market value test for women teenagers dating parental consent necessary

These studies typically focus on how specific attributes of individuals shape their browsing and messaging behavior.

The results indicate that, with respect to attributes such as physical attractiveness and income, people tend to pursue the most attractive partners ().

A standard measure of this reflected desirability is Page Rank ().

Here, we calculate Page Rank scores for the populations within each of our four cities (see the “Network analysis” section) and then rank men and women separately from least to most desirable.

This in turn implies that people differ in their opinions about what constitutes a desirable partner or at least about who is worth pursuing.

At the other extreme, and more in line with biological studies of mate selection (), lies the competition hypothesis, which assumes that there is consensus about what constitutes a desirable partner and that mate seekers, regardless of their own qualifications, pursue those partners who are universally recognized as most desirable ().

Page Rank scores simply give us, a posteriori, a glimpse of who is desirable on aggregate, by identifying those people who receive the largest number of messages from desirable others.

Thus, people compete on some attributes and match on others.

While these studies provide valuable insights about matching and competition on an attribute-by-attribute basis, they do not capture the overall dating hierarchy that reflects total demand for each person in the market.

At the simplest level, one can quantify desirability by the number of messages a user receives and specifically the number of initial messages, since it is the first contact between a pair of individuals that most reliably indicates who finds whom attractive.

Figure 1 shows the distribution of this quantity separately for men and women in each of the cities.

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